■ Medicine / Molecular therapy: A possibility for treating stroke patients Patients who have suffered from ischemic stroke may be able to restore their motor functions through transient in situ expression of pluripotency factors Patients who have suffered from ischemic stroke may be able to restore their ability to move through a method described as using “transient in situ expression of pluripotency factors”, according to research teams at Yonsei University College of Medicine led by professors Sung-Rae Cho of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Hyongbum Kim of the Department of Pharmacology. They announced that transient expression of four pluripotency factors (specifically, Oct4, Sox2, Myc,Read More →

■ Medicine / Gene mutation found causing kidney stones Mutations in a gene was found to be the culprit of kidney stone formation Research teams of Drs. Min Goo Lee and Heon Yung Gee in the Department of Pharmacology at the Yonsei University College of Medicine in collaboration with Dr. Hildebrandt in the Boston Children’s Hospital at Harvard University found mutations in a gene called SLC26A1 to be the culprit of kidney stone formation. The research results were released in the June 2016 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. Kidney stones form when minerals in urine are hardened like stones in the kidneyRead More →

■ Medicine / Causes for irreversible lung cancer treatment drug tolerance identified Researchers at Yonsei bring potential for developing new targeted lung cancer treatment drug Researchers at Yonsei University have found the causes of tolerance of drugs used to treat irreversible lung cancer. Following this discovery, there is now potential to develop new targeted lung cancer treatment drugs. Research teams led by professors Byoung Chul Cho and Hye Ryun Kim at the Yonsei Cancer Center Department of Medical Oncology claim to have found the cause of patients’ tolerance to anti-cancer drugs, specifically those who are afflicted with BRAF-mutated lung cancer (BRAF V600E genetic mutation non-small-cellRead More →

■ Medicine / Happy brains have higher capacity to cope with “bad information” Yonsei research team finds those with greater life satisfaction have more brain activity for coping with negative information What is the relationship between human brain function and life satisfaction, our so-called “happiness”? Recent research shows that when presented with negative, i.e., bad, information, those who have higher levels of life satisfaction tend to exhibit more brain activity that allows one to cope with that information. Research teams, led by Professor Jae-Jin Kim of the Gangnam Severance Hospital Department of Psychiatry and Professor Eun-Joo Kim of the Yonsei University Graduate School of Education,Read More →

■ Medicine / Method found to halt progression of Parkinson’s disease A research team led by Professor Phil Hyu Lee found a new way to counter the progression of irreversible Parkinson’s disease A group of researchers at Yonsei have found a new way to counter the progression of irreversible Parkinson’s disease. As toxic α-synuclein spreads and travels from one brain area to another, neurons degenerate and die. Thus, the progression of Parkinson’s disease is dependent on how well the α-synuclein proteins are controlled within the brain. A team led by Professor Phil Hyu Lee at the Yonsei University Severance Hospital Department of Neurology transplanted humanRead More →

■ Medicine / Unlocking the secret of Lorenzo’s Oil A team of researchers at Yonsei University revealed a novel mechanism in the pathogenesis of X-ALD The plot of a 1992 film starring Susan Sarandon and Nick Nolte, Lorenzo’s Oil, is based on the true story of a couple who searched for a treatment for their son afflicted with an incurable disease, X-linked adrenoleukodystropy (X-ALD). A team of researchers at Yonsei University revealed a novel mechanism in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. A joint research team of Drs. Dong-Wook Kim and Je-Wook Yu at Yonsei University College of Medicine analyzed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from ALDRead More →

■ Medicine / Find protein to treat sepsis A joint research team at Yonsei found that sestrin-2 can be used to treat sepsis Researchers Find Protein to Treat Sepsis Researchers at Yonsei University have discovered a way to treat sepsis, a potentially deadly condition in which severe inflammation throughout the body is brought on when toxins produced by bacteria enter the bloodstream. A joint research team led by Yonsei University College of Medicine professors Yoon Joo-heon and Ryu Ji-hwan has found that sestrin-2, a protein found in the human body, can be used to treat sepsis. The results of the study were published in theRead More →

■ Medicine / Live and let dye: Probes enabling immune cells to announce their success Yonsei biochemists develop a fluorescent probe capable of signaling immune-cell destruction of invading pathogens Among the many roles played by the human immune system, capturing and destroying invading bacterial pathogens is among the most important. However, the destruction of these pathogens results in production of molecules that can be harmful to cells and tissues. Moreover, the accumulation of these molecules can potentially result in the initiation of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Researchers are continually engaged in the discovery of methods that enable the detection of such molecules in order toRead More →

■ Life Sciences / Rub your hands and improve memory – fantasy or reality? A team of Yonsei biotechnologists and neuroscientists suggests that triboelectricity can be used to convert somatic cells to neurons Strokes, brain tumors, and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease, irreversibly destroy neurons in the brain, condemning people to permanent incapacitation or death. Neuronal degeneration is also the primary cause of memory loss and cognitive decline in elderly people. Therefore, neuroscientists have been working on strategies to restore the neuronal population in the brain, which is decreased by aging or disease. Among them, the conversion of pluripotentRead More →

■ Engineering & Technology / Making Molecular MIMO Work A group of researchers, including Prof. Chan-Byoung Chae, develops a novel MIMO design for molecular communication For communication systems operating on the microscale or nanoscale level, various technical problems occur: Is the antenna small enough? Can the wavelength of your communication signal be transmitted effectively? Are your data rates being hampered by interference? Researchers are looking at other ways to send signals from point A to B, and they have found an innovative approach: molecular communication, where data travels as chemical instead of electromagnetic signals. Koo, Lee, Yilmaz, Farsad, Eckford, and Chae (2016) present a novelRead More →